Marketing wisdom from marketing greats

26 Apr Marketing wisdom from marketing greats

In reading though my Feedly the other day (yes, I’m trying that one out now). I came across this post from Hubspot outlining 20 “pearls of wisdom” from marketing experts.

These 20 tid-bits were pulled from a larger pool of 54 that you can download from Hubspot here.

I’ve pulled out my top five and expanded on them just a bit:

“Learn to love data and, for heaven’s sake, write well.” – Ian Lurie, Portent

This one really resonates with me, personally, since I love looking at our data. But, it also rings true – the truth is in the numbers. You can tell what’s working, what’s not, what you should continue to write about, how well different channels work for your company and more, just from analyzing the data.

 

“Think of it more as publishing instead of marketing. Be authentic as a publisher and create content that helps you connect to everyone else … because they’re already connected.” – Mitch Joel, Twist Image

This is a great piece of advice when it comes to creating content. It should be more about putting out content that your customer base is interested in than telling them what you offer. If you can showcase your expertise on a topic they will search out your offerings on their own. Be a resource, not a mouthpiece.

 

“Educate more people that the tools have almost nothing to do with the true power of social media. It’s what’s inside those tools that matters (uh, the content).” – Joe Pulizzi, Content Marketing Institute

As marketers we all need to embrace social channels for what they are, not for what we want to get out of them. It’s not about the tool itself but about the content that lives on it and the people that interact with that content, and you.

 

“The approach that will win the hearts and minds of customers leverages content and context to create marketing that intersects with a customer’s lifestyle, needs, and interests.” – Brian Halligan, HubSpot

I think this quote really speaks to how much a company needs to understand its customers. Not just forming a buyer persona, which is a step in the right direction, but truly interacting with and understanding what their lives are like, so that content created will not just speak to their needs but also reach them where they already live.

 

“Don’t try to do it all. It’s better to be awesome on one or two channels than to overextend on six.” – Cameron Chapman, Author of The Smashing Idea Book: From Inspiration to Application

We use this phrase here at SBX all the time: Don’t try to boil the ocean. While it might seem like a great idea to be writing whitepapers, posting videos, engaging on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, blogging and more – it may actually dilute your message. Pick the channels where your target base actually engage and find useful and start there, get really ingrained. Then if you want to branch out (or see a need to) go for it.

 

Any pearls of wisdom of your own to add?

Ali Robinson
arobinson@speakerboxpr.com
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